Projection and scapegoating

The Left constantly engages in the twin tactics of projection and scapegoating.

If you are ever in doubt about what a Leftist’s deepest motivations are, just listen to the things that they attribute to conservatives.  We had a glaring example of this just this week when the NAACP leadership blasted the Tea Party movement as being “racist” – this from an organization whose very name trumpets racial identity politics!  Later in the week, we were “treated” to Al Sharpton, the king of racebaiters, on TV defending these false cries of racism by trotting out the thoroughly disproven charges of the N-word being repeatedly used against members of the Congressional Black Caucus (again…racial identity politics, anyone?) the day the healthcare monstrosity was passed.

For those unschooled in psychology, projection is the process of taking feelings and thoughts one finds unacceptable in themselves and “projecting” them onto another person with whom one is in conflict.  In other words, Joe can’t accept that he really is racist in his attitudes, so he accuses Bill of being racist towards him.  Sound like a president we know?  (“I don’t know all the facts, but the police acted stupidly!”)

Scapegoating is closely related but slightly different.  It goes along the lines of a T-shirt I remember one of my students wearing when I used to teach middle school.  It said: “I didn’t say it was your fault.  I just said I was going to blame you for it!”  In other words, if you can shift the blame to someone else, you can take the spotlight of responsibility off of yourself.  While it may be understandable with 12 year olds, it gets a bit wearisome as the constant refrain of the “leader of the free world” (ie: “everything is Bush’s fault”).

The always insightful Robin of Berkeley has another great column which sparked my thoughts on this subject.  In particular, I appreciated this passage:

If you’ve ever been scapegoated at work or at home, you know what it’s like; it’s psychologically eviscerating. Scapegoating is designed to wipe out another person’s humanity.

It also sends out a stern warning to others. Should they not toe the party line, they’ll be cast out as surely as were those sacrificial goats in Biblical times.
Scapegoating is so malevolent that M. Scott Peck made it the very definition of evil in his seminal book, People of the Lie. The evil person transfers his own sins onto another in order to maintain moral purity. “We become evil by attempting to hide from ourselves,” says Peck.

I had read Peck’s excellent book many years ago and had forgotten how spot on it is about the whole subject of the reality of evil in human experience.  He writes of how he was trained as a psychiatrist to not “judge” clients as evil, yet how he ran into some individuals for whom no other explanation would fit.

I know it is always dangerous to brand one’s political opponents as “evil” but it is hard to see how those on the hard Left don’t qualify.  They have absolutely no concern for the vigorously expressed will of the people (60% opposed to Obamacare – rammed it through anyway).  They mercilessly mock and impugn anyone who dares to speak out against their ideological agenda (ie: Joe the Plumber, the State of Arizona, the Tea Party, Sarah Palin, Michelle Bachman, et al.).

They keep ramming through gargantuan bills that no one can possibly even read, let alone understand, and then ridicule anyone calling them to task for it (see Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) – “I get a kick out of people saying ‘Read the bill’.  Who has two days and a team of lawyers to help you understand it?”  – Thanks for your dedication to your job, Rep Conyers.  You can go back to sleep now!)

Each of us needs to get a firm grasp on truth (temporal) and Truth (eternal) and continue to expose the lies wherever and whenever we encounter them.  That is the only true hope we have!

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About stevehull

Music director in Naples, FL
This entry was posted in Leftist deceit, Obama's arrogance and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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